Thursday, 17 January 2013

New Year Resolution: Bath More Often

This is not really a post about washing and personal hygiene although I suppose, in a way, it is.  Where can you sit and watch the steam rising from warm bath water whilst having liveried waiters serve you tea in a highly polished silver tea service along with traditional English afternoon tea of scones and cakes?  Add to this scene, chandeliers and a pianist playing at a grand piano and you could be forgiven that it is fantasy.


But, of course, it isn't for this is England and is just another example of the crossing of eccentricity, tradition and commercialism to create the Pump Room in the city of Bath.  In the photo below, the Pump Room is in the further building, the nearer one being the entrance to the Roman Baths themselves.

Bath developed soon after the Romans had invaded Britain giving it the name of Aquae Sulis about AD60 although the hot spring had been a sacred place even before then. Over the next three hundred years the waters were gradually enclosed and then abandoned two hundred years after that with the fall of the Roman Empire.


photo: view of the Roman baths from the Pump Room tea rooms

During the eighteenth century the Grand Pump Rooms were built where it was possible to 'take the waters'.  At this time, the dandy Beau Nash became Master of Ceremonies and made Bath the most fashionable resort in Britain - the future of the Pump Rooms was assured.


Photo: Beau Nash (statue) still presides over the social gatherings in the Pump Room

Today the Pump Rooms are the perfect place to relax and just absorb the genteel atmosphere.  It is very easy to imagine  Catherine Morland visiting here in the hope of meeting Mr Tilney in Jane Austen's novel Northanger Abbey.  Although the rooms are steeped in tradition they are not an intimidating place to  visit and all are welcome - it isn't necessary to be wearing formal clothes! They are open every day for lunch and tea or, if you really want to be exclusive, you can book them for your private party in the evenings.



Photo: even the stairway to the cloakrooms has style!

In the YouTube video below, the music is performed by the Pump Room Trio, the longest, continuous playing  ensemble in Europe.  The fountain is shown in the clip where you can try the water yourself for which, I believe, there is no charge even if you don't stay for tea.


Bath is a fascinating city to visit and a World Heritage Site.  This will be one New Year's Resolution that will be easy to keep: visit Bath more often.


Photo: The Royal Crescent, Bath


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5 comments:

  1. Really enjoyed the Youtube link! Never been to Bath but have always wanted to visit. Lucky you.

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  2. Lovely. We aren't far from Bath, we ought to go more often too.
    Looking forward to seeing photos of the secret valley in the snow :-)

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  3. Thanks, Bren & Kath for the messages. Bath is only about an hour or so from the secret valley so I have no excuse for not going there more regularly. Somehow the nearer a place is to visit the less frequently you tend to do it.

    I imagine,Kath, that you are snowed in too. There will be some photos of the snowy secret valley on the Facebook page very soon - click on the link at the top right of this page to visit from the comfort of a warm armchair!

    Johnson

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  4. My daughter and I visited Bath 2 years ago and we loved it! Although we saw the Pump room we did not get a chance to have tea there. Another time! Jeannine

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  5. Hi Jeannine; thanks for the comment.

    I'm glad that you enjoyed your visit - next time treat yourself to tea! The next post I've written is about Bath Abbey Church which is another place well worth visiting and almost next door to the Pump Rooms.

    Johnson

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